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Federal Work-Study Authorization

FWS (Personal)
GO Federal Work-Study Authorization

Description

  • For Students (current)

Federal Work-Study

Welcome to the Federal Work-Study Program (FWS) at the University of Maryland. FWS is a federally funded employment program available to both undergraduate and graduate students who exhibit financial need. The FWS Program is designed to assist students with meeting their educational and living expenses through part-time employment. New participants in the FWS program are strongly encouraged to attend an orientation session. These orientations enhance student knowledge of FWS student expectations, how to contact employers, and how to earn your award. This year, the orientation session will also give you the opportunity to hear from and speak to past FWS student employees about their experiences in the FWS program. To find listings of orientation dates and locations, please see our Important Dates section..
Benefits of Participating

Benefits of participating in the FWS Program include:
Valuable professional development opportunities at convenient on-campus locations
Flexible work scheduling around your class times
Opportunity to find employment that corresponds with your educational interests.
FWS earnings are not counted against your financial need for the next year’s FAFSA
Eligibility

To be considered for FWS, you must complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and demonstrate financial need. Funds are limited and not all students who apply and are eligible will receive a FWS award. In addition, you must:
Indicate interest in FWS on the FAFSA
Submit the FAFSA by the UMD priority deadline – January 1
Enroll in a minimum of 6 undergraduate credits at the University of Maryland, College Park
About FWS Jobs

It is your responsibility to find a job and work toward earning your FWS award. Students awarded with Federal Work-Study can begin searching for and securing a job accordingly:
To start working: Start job searching:
Fall Late July
Spring Late December
*Summer (*if offered) *Early May
Average work schedules range from 10 to 15 hours a week, with a maximum of 20 hours.
Follow these 10 easy steps to begin your employment and participation in the FWS Program:
Submit a FAFSA by the UMD priority deadline of January 1.
If awarded with FWS funds, accept your award on Testudo.
Attend an orientation presentation (Optional but strongly recommended).
Search for job openings that interest you on the FWS webpage.
Contact FWS employers by sending them your cover letter and your resume. In the job listing descriptions, employers indicate how they prefer to be contacted (phone e-mail or in-person). Be professional in your email. Inquire about setting up an interview in both your email and your cover letter.
See our helpful tips on Cover Letter/Resume writing!
Attend an interview! It is highly encouraged that you prepare ahead of time for your interview and you get to your interview early.
For more helpful interview tips, see information on Interview and Professional Etiquette!
Secure a position.
Submit the FWS Work Authorization for the correct academic year to your employer and to OSFA.
Set up your Payroll and Work Schedule with your employer.
Begin working and earning your FWS Award!
How to Receive Earnings

A FWS award is not credited toward your tuition bill or received up front. The amount you earn depends on your hourly rate and how many hours you work. Students are paid directly through bi-weekly paychecks.
Other On-Campus Part-time Employment

You do not have to apply for financial aid or be awarded with FWS to secure a job on-campus. For non-FWS part-time job listings, please contact the Career Center.

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Office of Student Financial Aid

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